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CRN’s publicist Joe Ortiz Honored by The City of Indio, California PDF Print E-mail
Written by Staff   
Monday, 28 January 2013 02:33

Indio, California: Joe Ortiz, veteran broadcaster, journalist, talk show host, public relations consultant, published author and blogger, was honored by his hometown of Indio, California, on December 19, 2012. Elaine Holmes, incoming Mayor for the City of Indio, presented her first ever proclamation to Joe Ortiz, a “Lifetime Achievement” award, recognizing him for his over 40 year career as a communications specialist and for his work with the poor.

Upon acceptance, Joe shared a brief history of his life and who he is.

In attendance were Joe’s closes friends, actor Richard Yniguez, legendary Chicano Rock Artist Mark Guerrero, with his girl friend Sylvia Corrales, and his sister-in-law, Patricia Marcil Ortiz..

Read more: https://sites.google.com/site/theendtimespassover/main-page

READ MORE: http://wp.me/piUMn-lo

Last Updated on Monday, 28 January 2013 02:45
 
Multimedia host Joe Ortiz Honored by The City of Indio, California PDF Print E-mail
Written by Frenkie   
Monday, 28 January 2013 02:30

 

Jan.28, 2013 - Joe Ortiz, veteran broadcaster, journalist, talk show host, public relations consultant, published author and blogger, was honored by his hometown of Indio, California, on December 19, 2012. Elaine Holmes, incoming Mayor for the City of Indio, presented her first ever proclamation to Joe Ortiz, a “Lifetime Achievement” award, recognizing him for his over 40 year career as a communications specialist and for his work with the poor.

Upon acceptance, Joe shared a brief history of his life and who he is.

In attendance were Joe’s closes friends, actor Richard Yniguez, legendary Chicano Rock Artist Mark Guerrero, with his girl friend Sylvia Corrales, and his sister-in-law, Patricia Marcil Ortiz..

Read more: https://sites.google.com/site/theendtimespassover/main-page

READ MORE: http://wp.me/piUMn-lo

Last Updated on Monday, 28 January 2013 02:47
 
Latinos take on bigger role in Obama inauguration PDF Print E-mail
Written by Staff   
Monday, 21 January 2013 00:33

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Latinos are taking a more prominent role in President Barack Obama's second inauguration, from the first Hispanic Supreme Court justice swearing in the vice president to a star-studded concert celebrating Latino culture.

Eva Longoria, a co-chairwoman for Obama's campaign, hosted "Latino Inaugural 2013: In Performance at the Kennedy Center" as a salute to the president Sunday evening ahead of his public swearing-in Monday. Jose Feliciano, Chita Rivera, Rita Moreno and Latin pop star Prince Royce all performed. The lineup also included Mario Lopez and Wilmer Valderrama.

Vice President Joe Biden and his family appeared onstage, drawing big cheers, to help open the show. He said he wanted to thank Latinos for their support in last year's election.

Biden said something profound happened with the enormous Latino support for Obama, and he said the Latino community underestimates its power.

"One thing that happened in this election, you spoke. You spoke in a way that the world, and I mean the world, as well as the United States, could not fail to hear," Biden said, calling the Latino vote decisive. "This is your moment. America owes you."

Feliciano opened the show by singing the national anthem.

Marc Anthony later drew big cheers when he applauded Latinos' growing political influence.

"Our united voice got us all here tonight and got the best man for the job in the White House," Anthony said.

San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro, who gave the keynote speech at last year's Democratic National Convention, recalled the admiration Latinos held for another president more than 50 years ago. Portraits of President John F. Kennedy still hang in many homes, he said.

"As we said 'Viva Kennedy' 50 years ago, today we say 'Viva Obama,'" Castro said.

A children's choir from San Juan, Puerto Rico, closed out the show, singing "This Land is Your Land." They were joined by a larger Latino choir, including Hispanic members of the U.S. military, in singing "America the Beautiful."

Earlier Sunday, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, an Obama appointee who is the first Hispanic justice on the highest court, administered the oath of office to Biden. And Richard Blanco, a son of Cuban exiles, is Obama's inauguration poet.

Latinos have a distinct presence at this inauguration after raising funds and turning out the vote for Obama in the 2012 election. Hispanics voted 7 to 1 for Obama over his challenger, Republican Mitt Romney, whose Hispanic support was less than any other presidential candidate in 16 years. Analysts said Romney's hardline stance on immigration was a factor.

San Antonio philanthropist and business leader Henry Munoz III, who coordinated the Latino inauguration event with Longoria and other Obama supporters, said this is a special moment when the Latino community is positioned to take an expanded role in shaping the country's future.

"Without question, the presidential election of 2012 proves that Latinos are perhaps the most important influence from this point forward in the election of the president of the United States," Munoz said. "It's important that the leadership in Washington view us not as a narrow interest group but as a vibrant political force" that carries not just votes, but influence and financial resources.

Organizers planned a series of symposiums, dinners and events ahead of the inauguration to keep people talking about issues that matter to Latinos, from immigration reform to building a Latino history museum on the National Mall. Munoz led a presidential commission that called on Congress in 2011 to authorize such a museum within the Smithsonian Institution, but Congress has not yet passed such a bill.

Munoz said it's important to keep Latinos engaged through the inauguration and beyond.

"Our work is not done. It doesn't end," he said. "We have a tendency to look at this phenomenon as ending on Election Day, when the reality is now it's time to get to work."

Longoria said this is her first inauguration. She has taken on a new role as political advocate since her days on "Desperate Housewives," pushing for a Latino history museum in Washington and raising funds for Obama's re-election.

Even though this is Obama's second inauguration, Longoria said there is still much to celebrate, including Sotomayor's role swearing in the vice president.

"There's something special about seeing a president recommit himself to the people of this great nation," she said before the show.

Longoria said she hopes to help influence policies, including immigration reform, and hopes Obama will make that his top priority as an economic issue. She called the Latino fundraising effort for the president a historic turning point.

"I think we have a permanent seat at the table, and now we're going to be able to have influence on what affects our communities," Longoria said. "I take civic responsibility very seriously, and I want to do what I can to help my country."

 

Last Updated on Monday, 21 January 2013 00:44
 
Tina Turner to Become Swiss Citizen PDF Print E-mail
Written by Staff   
Friday, 25 January 2013 23:43

She’s an American icon, but Tina Turner is reportedly about to renounce her U.S. citizenship in order to become a Swiss citizen.

The “Private Dancer” singer has lived in the Zurich suburb of Kuesnacht since the mid-1990s. The Zuerichsee-Zeitung newspaper said on its website that the local council announced its decision to grant the 73-year-old Turner citizenship in an official notice published in today’s edition, according to The Associated Press.

The decision still requires formal approval from state and federal authorities.

Turner’s rep did not respond immediately to ABCNews.com’s request for comment, but she told Zuerichsee-Zeitung that the singer wanted to “clarify her situation.”

“Tina Turner will therefore also give back her U.S. citizenship,” her rep told the Swiss newspaper.

After the announcement, Turner told German newspaper Blick, “I am very happy in Switzerland and I feel at home here. I could not imagine a better place to live.”

Turner, who was born Anna Mae Bullock in Nutbush, Tenn., became famous as part of the duo Ike and Tina Turner, with such hits as “Proud Mary.” But after a tumultuous and violent relationship with Ike, Turner split from him and went solo in the late 1970s, relaunching her career as a rock artist and staging an amazing comeback with the hit album “Private Dancer.”

The singer, who has sold 200 million records, first came to Zurich with her longtime partner, German music manager Erwin Bach. They live in a lake house called Chateau Algonquin.

 

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/entertainment/2013/01/tina-turner-to-become-swiss-citizen/

 
Eastside record label still spinning out the music PDF Print E-mail
Written by Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times   
Saturday, 19 January 2013 03:53

Rampart Records’ founder had hoped it would become a ‘Mexican American Motown.’ Its current head just hopes it can keep on going.


January 08, 2013| By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times

Hector Gonzalez earlier had a career as a TV sound-man, receiving an Emmy award as part of a team covering the 1984 Olympics. He took a buyout from CBS after the Rampart Records founder died and left the business to him in 1994.

Hector Gonzalez earlier had a career as a TV sound-man, receiving an Emmy… (Irfan Khan / Los Angeles…)

Hector Gonzalez straps a five-string bass guitar over his belly inside a music studio on a dreary stretch of Monterey Park. He plays as a smooth, prerecorded tenor joins a funky accordion through his headphones.

Trying to bite a bullet, or sometimes count to 10,

For the sake of argument, let’s just pretend,

We both agree to disagree.

Gonzalez is helping a silky-voiced old band-mate record a nostalgic-sounding soul album. But in a larger sense, the 59-year-old music producer is trying to keep alive a legacy he inherited 18 years ago.

Gonzalez is the head of Rampart Records, which earned a measure of fame in the 1960s as the originator of the “West Coast East-side Sound” — and whose founder dreamed of its becoming a Mexican American Motown.

That was Eddie Davis, who produced bands from Boyle Heights, East L.A. and the San Gabriel Valley with names like the Blendells, the Romancers, the Premiers, and Cannibal and the Headhunters. The last group toured with the Beatles in 1965 after scoring a big hit with “Land of a Thousand Dances.”

Rampart’s stable of musicians consisted of kids from the barrios, often discouraged by their parents from speaking Spanish because they were afraid they would be discriminated against. Their role models were often black artists. One weekend they might share the same stage at the El Monte Legion Stadium with Chuck Berry or Ray Charles, and the next vie with mariachis for gigs at baptismal parties, quinceañeras and weddings.

But by the 1970s, with immigration from Mexico booming, the distinctly Mexican American sound that Rampart championed — almost all of it sung in English — became overshadowed by Mexican music, which appealed to both the American-born and the immigrant.

Even though several Mexican American bands, including East L.A.’s Los Lobos, have gained fame since, Gonzalez believes most acts are largely overshadowed by Spanish-language artists, particularly from Mexico, who get to tap into a colossal media network including TV giants like Univision and popular Spanish-language radio stations.

“The Mexican American isn’t seen as being as profitable, man,” he says, revealing an undercurrent of tension between the two groups. “The immigrant is more profitable.”

That hasn’t stopped him from trying to resurrect the dream of a Mexican American Motown, re-releasing classic albums, making the music digitally available in scores of countries and signing new acts.

He knows it won’t be easy. But he believes it’s his destiny.

“I figured I’m going to try to be the guy, even if I end up homeless.”

::

Gonzalez is sitting in his Rampart Records office in a squat stucco cottage in Santa Fe Springs, across the street from a gentleman’s club and conjoined to a smog-testing business.

It’s a cave of an office, about the size of a cruise ship cabin, packed with vintage Vox amplifiers, recording equipment, vinyl albums, master tapes and promotional material from the ’60s and ’70s, and random toys like the monster from Ridley Scott’s sci-fi classic “Alien.” A promotional pamphlet Davis conjured up in 1970 proclaims: “The Sound of a New Generation, Chicanos are Happening!”

The office doubles as his home, with a fridge and a sink. In a back room, an over sized guitar — or guitarron — hangs over his bed, along with a poster of Robert De Niro from “Taxi Driver” and a painting of the Virgin Mary holding the baby Jesus. He likes to work on his music at night, when the noise outside on Norwalk Boulevard ebbs.

Nothing in the office suggests that a would-be music mogul occupies it except Gonzalez’s energy. Stocky, with a robust mustache and a baseball cap, Gonzalez drives a pale olive green ’65 Thunderbird with a rust-marbled top and talks in fast superlatives.

“My whole thing was to keep the legacy and the voice of the Mexican American going,” he says. “The musical voice of us.”

Gonzalez is telling the story of how he met Davis, a music impresario who was a former child actor turned restaurant owner. Davis had started his career as a music mogul in the late 1950s, producing both black and white artists. As a child his family moved to Boyle Heights, and by the early 1960s, he was a committed producer of Mexican American rock.

It was a good time to do this. Ritchie Valens had inspired many young Mexican Americans, and elsewhere, other Mexican American acts were making their mark, including Michigan’s Question Mark and the Mysterians (“96 Tears”) and Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs (“Wooly Bully”).

Gonzalez had never heard of Davis while growing up in South L.A. and then Bell. But after starting a soul band with some friends, he began to ask older musicians for advice on breaking out, and they told him to go find Eddie Davis. He tried, but it wasn’t easy.

“I went through the Yellow Pages. It was impossible to find him,” Gonzalez says. “Finally, I found him. He was under Record Manufacturer. He had an office in Hollywood.”

 

http://www.crnlive.com/CRNBlog/index.php/2013/01/eastside-record-label-still-spinning-out-the-music/

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 January 2013 04:00
 
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